A Look Behind The Book With Heidi Swain.

20170104_091654Since her debut in 2015, Heidi Swain has quickly risen up the ranks to become a best-selling author with her hugely popular brand of “feel good fiction”.

The good news for her many fans is that earlier this year Heidi started writing full time – and that hopefully means we will get to enjoy even more of her wonderful books.

Speaking of which, the author’s eagerly awaited new novel, Sleigh Rides And Silver Bells At The Christmas Fair, comes out next month.

Before that Heidi, who is based in my adopted home county of Norfolk, agreed to talk to me for my latest Behind The Book post, which I am thrilled about.

Here’s what she had to say:

How did the idea for your debut, The Cherry Tree Cafe, take shape? How long did it take to write? Was it always your dream to write and publish a book?

The Cherry Tree Cafe was the second novel I wrote. The first, long since consigned to the memory stick, was an attempt to see if I had enough words in me to fill a book. I enjoyed the process so much that I thought I would do it again but this time with a plot that indulged my passion for cakes, crafts and friendship.

I can’t remember how long it took to write but it was considerably longer than my latest book and yes, it was always my dream to be published. At the Cherry Tree launch party a school friend told me that she could remember me scribbling away between lessons.

It was picked up by Books and The City (Simon & Schuster) following an open submission (and went on to be an Amazon best-seller). How did you find out they were interested and what was that like?

I had submitted the book to the Romantic Novelists’ Association New Writers Scheme and on the back of such positive feedback decided that this would be the novel which, one way or another, would be my debut. The Books and the City open submission came along at just the right time and I had an email a few weeks later telling me they loved it and wanted me to go to London for a meeting. I think I held my breath from then until I heard the magical words ‘we’d like to offer you a two book deal.’ It was amazing. Verification that I might just be able to spend the rest of my life doing the very thing I love most. I feel incredibly lucky.

Are you ever sad to see any of your stories come to an end? I imagine it’s almost like living with the characters, albeit in your head, after a while, do you miss them? If that’s not a daft question.

Not a daft question at all. You’d be amazed how often I’ll be out shopping and think ‘Lizzie Dixon would love that dress,’ only to then remember that she’s a fictional friend and not a real one…but I tell her anyway. Now that’s daft!

I can’t say I’ve ever felt sad to see a story end. If I’ve got the ending right it feels like completing a circle and of course with five books based in and around Wynbridge I know the characters will always have the chance to pop up again.

Can you talk about your heroes? Are they ever based, even in part, on real people, actors for example or someone you know? How do you make sure that they are appealing to the reader?

I’ve only ever written one character based on someone I know and that was because they were simply too irresistible not to include. I’m not telling you who it is though.

With regards to making heroes appealing, that isn’t something I consciously think about when I’m writing. I always make my main characters people I would like to be friends with, people who aren’t perfect but real and I think that comes across and strikes a chord.

What’s the most exciting thing to happen since your first book came out (besides publishing more)?

That is such a difficult question to answer. Hundreds of exciting things have happened but I’ll force myself to pin it down to two. The first was in May last year when I was asked to attend an event organized by my publisher, along with some of their other commercial fiction authors. The venue was incredibly swanky and overlooked the Thames and Tower Bridge. Lovely Jane Costello stepped out onto the balcony before the guests had arrived and said ‘today is a good day to be an author’. I couldn’t have put it better myself.

My second standout moment was discovering that The Cherry Tree Cafe had been such an e-book sensation it was going to be published in paperback as well. Not only was this an exciting moment for me, but also the many, many readers who had been constantly asking if it was ever going to happen.

And I know I said I’d stick to two but Milly Johnson, who has been the most supportive author pal imaginable, supplied a quote for the front of Coming Home To Cuckoo Cottage this year and I just don’t think I can top that!

Do you write full time? Is it like a 9-5? Does it flow easier the more books you write? Do you ever get writers’ block? How do you combat it?

Yes, I do write full time now. In June this year, having secured an agent and written two books within 12 months for the second year running I took the decision to leave the day job.

If I’m working on a first draft I tend to write at all hours and all over the place. When the words are flowing it is paramount to capitalise on the moment. However, after the first draft frenzy a routine is re-established. I like to start as early in the day as family life allows with a view to finishing at lunchtime and then use afternoons for writing blog posts and catching up with social media. I try and keep weekends free. Apart from Twittering of course. I’m never off Twitter.

I don’t necessarily think it does get easier. If anything it’s harder because your expectations are higher. You are constantly striving to make the next book better than the last. That said, I’d written the first draft for Sleigh Rides in ten weeks whereas a previous one was a real battle. A lot of that was down to life throwing spanners in the works. You have to factors those in I’m afraid, but don’t let them stop you.

No, I haven’t experienced writers’ block. I’ve had tough times and I’ve struggled but I simply refuse to let those days get the better of me. I force myself through it.

There seems to be a strong community of lovely writers, particularly on social media, who all offer support. How important is that to your writing? Do you belong to a writing group or have help (aside from your editor?)

The online writing community is hugely supportive and that is incredibly important. I don’t currently belong to a writing group but I do have lots of author pals who are just a message away and I attend occasional local one-off creative writing day courses and RNA events to ensure I interact with real people rather than just stare at a screen or notepad all day. Being an author is essentially an isolating experience and for a chatterbox like me my author pals are a real sanity saver.

sleigh-ridesCan you talk about what you’re working on at the moment? 

At the moment I’m balancing a couple of things. My Christmas 17 read, Sleigh Rides And Silver Bells At the Christmas Fair, will be published in October so I’m doing lots of promo for that while at the same time working on my summer 18 release and of course planning what will come next. It’s always pretty frantic but I love it.

Your Twitter profile says you write “feel good fiction”. It’s not only my favourite type (to read and write) but, under the broad umbrella of romantic fiction, it is always near the top (if not the top) of the best-selling and most popular genres. And yet, critics still seem consistently underrate it? Does it make you cross and do you ever feel the need to defend what you write?

No, I can’t say I ever get cross or defensive about that because I listen to what the readers have to say. As you point out ‘feel good fiction’ hits those best-seller spots all the time and that adds up to a lot of very happy readers, reading stories that they love and I feel honoured to write them.

When someone tweets or messages to say they’ve saved my book for their holiday read or that they were delighted to find it in their Christmas stocking, that’s an absolute highlight for me.

heidiswainquote

Any top tips for struggling writers?

Never stop believing and never give up. If you really want to be a writer then make that commitment and give it everything you’ve got. Once you’ve made the decision to succeed nothing will hold you back – you’ll make time to write, you’ll find a way to be published and you’ll wonder why you didn’t get on it with it years ago.

~

I can’t thank Heidi enough for taking the time to answer my questions, especially when she’s got so much going on at the moment. I particularly love what she said about making the decision to succeed. What do you guys think?

You can pre-order her new book, which is out on October 5th, here, find out more about her via her website or have a chat on Twitter.

I will have two more Behind The Book posts for you next month.

 

 

Advertisements

A Look Behind The Book With Julie Stock.

Julie-StockWhile many writers chase often elusive publishing deals, going “indie” has its own rewards – as author, Julie Stock, proves.

The race to write and publish her first book, From Here To Nashville, before she hit the big 5 0 might have been what initially inspired her to go that route but with two successful contemporary romances under her belt – and another on the way – Julie’s hard work is paying off.

In my latest Behind The Book interview, she explains more about her journey into print – with some wonderful advice for all writers at the end.

When did you start writing?  Has it always been a passion?

Until about four years ago, I’d never written anything longer than a poem or lyrics for songs, and most of my writing as an adult has been for day jobs. I started writing my first novel in April 2013 because I had an idea that I thought could work for that length. That had never happened to me before! I knew it would be a romance because that’s the genre I read the most. Both my novels are contemporary romances and I’ve also written a novella and a number of short stories in the genre.

Do you plan your stories?

When I started writing, I was a ‘pantser,’ although at that point, I had no idea what that was. I wrote that first book with only the loosest idea of what was going to happen. It was an incredible experience for me but I had to do so many rewrites to even finish the first draft that I knew I would prefer to plot more next time round.

With my second book, The Vineyard In Alsace, which I started, again with no plan during NaNoWriMo one year, I got to 80,000 words and decided that the story wasn’t working. I then got rid of 40,000 words before going on to finish the first draft. It was really hard but I knew that the story just wasn’t the one I wanted to tell. Again, lots of rewriting followed but I knew I had the right story by then.

So before I started my third book, which I’m writing now, I really did try and do much more of an outline before starting. It has still evolved a lot as I’ve gone on but I feel this will be a much better first draft than I’ve written before.

How long did it take to write each book, including drafts? Were you writing full time? If not, how did you make time to write against all the other life stuff we have to do?

It takes me about six – nine months to write the first draft, and with rewrites and editing, it takes about another six – nine months to be ready for publication. I could possibly write faster if it was my full-time job but I do procrastinate a lot! When I wrote my first book, I was working full-time as a teacher but I so wanted to do it that I found the time, even if I was only writing 300 words a day.

Nowadays, I work for a charity in the mornings and I do occasional supply teaching as well as some freelance web design work so I can commit to writing 1,000 or more words a day if I’m working to a deadline, and if I write that many, I feel really pleased with myself! If I know what I want to write, that only takes me about an hour so I don’t really have any excuses not to get that done.

Juliestock

 

Your first book is partly set in Nashville and your second in Alsace. How important is location to your work? Are they places you have enjoyed? Are you tempted to go to places purely for research?

The setting of my books is really what starts the story idea off for me. I have always been a singer myself and together with my love of country music, I had an idea for a story set both in the UK and in Nashville. My premise for From Here To Nashville, my first novel, was what if you had a singer/songwriter based in the UK who dreamed of becoming a country music star and going to Nashville. That’s the only place you would want to go as a country music singer so it fit the storyline. I only went to Nashville myself after writing the story but I had to go once the story was written.

Similarly, my love of France, especially Alsace and my knowledge of the winemaking industry from a former job, gave me the idea for my second book set on a vineyard in Alsace. I’ve been several times and so I was able to draw on my knowledge quite readily for my book.

I love to travel and when I do, I think about whether those places would make a good setting for the story I want to tell. So the place tends to inspire the story and I’ll often take lots of photos and make lots of notes for future reference, if I go somewhere on holiday and think it would work for a book.

You decided to go indie very early on and, as a result, didn’t submit to any publishers. Can you please talk about why you picked that route and the pros and cons?

I started writing my first book when I was 48 and it was reading how someone else had self-published that made me wonder about doing that myself when previously that just wouldn’t have been possible. My motivation with the first book was to publish it before my 50th birthday and so I didn’t have time to wait around for agents and publishers at that point.

It is hard to self-publish because you have to pay upfront for editing, proofreading and cover design before you’ve even sold any books. On top of that, the marketing is almost a full-time job in itself. However, what I enjoy is having control over every aspect of the process and when the results come in, they’re all down to me and that’s a good feeling. I did try to get an agent and publisher with my second book and came very close but not close enough. At that point, I realised that I could just do it myself again and my second book is doing so well that I don’t regret that decision at all.

Do you think the rise of social media has helped when it comes to self-publishing? How important is it to you? Is Twitter your favourite?

I suppose social media has helped indie authors to make themselves a bit more visible amongst the millions of authors out there, and I am active on Twitter and also on my Facebook page, as well as a couple of other sites to a lesser extent. However, I don’t know how much they influence sales as such – it’s very hard to tell but I enjoy being on it to the level that I am involved so I’ll continue with it as long as that remains the case.

It seems like when you self publish you have to be a jack of all trades – from cover design, type-setting, promotion etc. Which part was the easiest and which part was the hardest? Is there anything you know now that wish you had known for your first book?

The_Vineyard_in_Alsa_Cover_for_KindleFor me, the easiest part of self-publishing is uploading my book to Amazon’s Kindle Direct Publishing because I can compile my manuscript straight from Scrivener which is the writing software package I use. It really couldn’t be any easier.

The hardest job is finding the time to try out all the new ways of promoting yourself as an author. Sometimes, it’s very easy to spend all your time on marketing and promotion, and then you find you have no time to write! You have to be quite disciplined to make time for your writing and if you’re a bit of a procastinator…

I’m not sure there’s anything I wish I’d known for my first book, apart from learning more about plotting! Still, I may have given up before I’d even got started if I’d spent all my time learning how to plot. Sometimes the best way of learning is to throw yourself in the deep end and give it a go!

Many of the authors I enjoy reading are members of the Romantic Novelists Association (RNA). Can you tell me why you joined and what you get from it?

Joining the RNA was quite simply the best decision I’ve ever made. I went to a Festival of Romance in November 2013 and there was a panel of RNA authors there that day who told me about the New Writers’ Scheme. I joined in January 2014 and I have made many good friends since then, at parties, events and conferences. The RNA is full of such generous writers all ready to give advice when asked, and the friendship is second to none. I’m about to graduate from the NWS now to be an independent author member of the RNA and I feel very proud to have reached that milestone. I couldn’t have done it without the support of so many lovely writing friends.

What are you working on at the moment?

I’m trying to finish the first draft of my third book, set in a restaurant in Devon. This will be the last book I submit to the RNA’s New Writers’ Scheme and the deadline is August 31st so I am up against it a bit. I will then be editing a novella I wrote some time ago, which is a sequel to my first novel, From Here to Nashville. I hope to publish it later this year, and the new novel next year.

Finally, do you have any tips for writers perhaps thinking of going the indie route?

If you’re a new writer of romance, join the RNA’s New Writers’ Scheme to get early support with your writing. Make sure that when you’ve finished your draft and first round of edits that you seek the help of a professional editor. This should be followed up with a professional proofread. If you can afford to pay for a professional cover designer as well, so much the better but there are cheaper options that will still produce a good cover for you. For advice on all the practical aspects of self-publishing, join the Alliance of Independent Authors too.

The other piece of advice I would give is something I heard from another writer recently, which is that if you write, you’re a writer. So try not to let your fears get in your way. You can do it – you just need to make a start.

~

Thank you very much to Julie for answering my questions, despite not only being on deadline but also preparing for a literary festival. I found so much of what she said useful in a practical sense but I was also really inspired by her journey – especially trying to write and be published in your 40s. That last piece of shared advice is a keeper too.

You can find out more about Julie via her website follow her on Twitter and like her on Facebook. You can also buy both her books via Amazon here.

I’ll have another Behind The Book for you on August 21st.

 

A Look Behind The Book With Jessica Redland.

Jessica Close Up Stripes

I fell in love with the story behind Jessica Redland’s debut, Searching For Steven, before I even opened the book – although that more than lived up to my (very high) expectations.

Since then she’s written four more wonderfully romantic, funny, feel good stories with the latest, Bear With Me, released earlier this year (and, at the time of writing, having ALL five star reviews on Amazon).

But it hasn’t all been plain sailing and in my latest Behind The Book interview, Jessica not only offers some fantastic insight into the writing process and indie publishing but she also has some very helpful and encouraging advice for anyone perhaps having the odd doubt about their own work (ME!).

I am really thrilled to share her answers with you.

I LOVE the backstory to your first book, Searching For Steven, can you please share it again?

Aw, thank you. In the early noughties, I was working in Reading as a graduate recruitment and development manager. My manager often said that my reports read like a story and I should write a book. He’d planted the seed but I had no idea what I’d write about so I pushed it aside.

In 2002, I’d split up with my boyfriend and our house was on the market. The original plan had been to stay in Reading and buy a house on my own, but I had this gnawing idea of moving back home to the north-east and setting up a teddy bear shop. Slightly different! A friend gave me a gift voucher for a telephone clairvoyant. It wasn’t really my thing but I decided that it was worth giving her a call. Perhaps talking through the situation with a stranger might help me get some clarity in my own mind.

The clairvoyant told me that I would move back home and open my own business and she was very accurate about when this would be and how long I’d live with my parents before moving into my own home. She also told me that I’d meet the man of my dreams when I moved back home and he’d be called Steven. How exciting! And what was equally exciting – perhaps moreso – was that I suddenly had the illusive idea for my story.

So, you had a fabulous story idea but had you always wanted to be a writer? How did you get started on your first book? How long did it take to write and how many versions did you do before you started to send it off to publishers? 

I’d love to say that it was six months, or even a year, but I’d be telling a porky pie. It actually took me well over a decade to write Searching For Steven. The clairvoyant conversation which prompted the premise for the novel happened in September 2002 and it brewed for a few months. I moved back home in April the following year and opened my bear shop the month after. It was then that I started putting fingers to keyboard.

I have no idea how many versions I wrote of Steven but it was a huge number. HUGE! I started in first person, then changed it all to third, then changed it back again. I started in past tense, then changed it to present, but thankfully changed my mind on that one before I’d changed the whole manuscript. The beginning caused me an absolute nightmare. I wouldn’t be exaggerating if I said I had about 40 different versions of that.

Over the next decade, I wrote and re-wrote Steven many, many times. I had significant periods of time where I didn’t write at all, though, and had several life events during the years like closing my business, getting married, having a baby, moving three times, and changing job several times.

In 2012, I joined the RNA (Romantic Novelists’ Association) through their New Writers’ Scheme (NWS). I knew that Steven was overly-long but was ready to seek his critique by early August that year. I edited him (including the start again) based on that feedback and put him through again the next year, then massively edited him again after that second critique (and yes, you’ve guessed it, the start changed yet again!)

It was late 2014 when I felt he was ready to seek a home with a publisher or agent. Yes, it was scary, but it’s one of those things you just have to crack on with. Several of the publishers insisted on postal submissions so I had many nervous waiting for the post to arrive days. The thing that surprised me about the process was that I didn’t get upset at any passes. Getting a no meant that I at least knew the outcome and could move on with a new submission. The hardest challenge was publishers who promised a 12-week turnaround … then took a whopping 9 months to say no! This actually happened to me twice. That’s a very, very long-time to be kept nervously waiting.

You secured a three-book deal but parted company with your publisher in 2016 to go it alone. Can you talk a little about your decision?

In summer 2014, I’d been submitting to publishers and agents for about nine months. I’d had a couple of “near misses” from agents (really positive feedback to say that they loved it but only took one or two new writers a year and didn’t love it quite enough to make me one of them) but I hadn’t found a home for Steven. I had him with three more publishers and had decided that I was going to wait for the outcome of those submissions but not try any others. If none of them wanted Steven, I was going to go indie. I was really into the idea and fully expected that to be the way I got my work out there so I was a little stunned when two of the final three offered me a publishing deal. It was a tough decision because, deep down, I thought indie was right for me, but I knew I’d regret turning down the opportunity of a publishing deal and that, if it didn’t work out, I could still go indie later.

Everything was fine at first. My publisher was new and they were really enthusiastic and committed to making it work but this seemed to wane over time and, when the owner secured another job, I wondered if the writing was on the wall for the company. After the trilogy was released, I had an open and honest conversation with the owner and she agreed to release me from my contract and revert my rights back to me.

It wasn’t an easy decision to part company. Steven was doing reasonably well. He certainly wasn’t setting the Amazon charts alight but I was selling a reasonable number of copies each day. I worried about losing that momentum, but I knew that I would feel happier being indie and that there was nothing I was getting from my publisher that I couldn’t do myself. I liked the idea of being in control of my covers, deadlines, pricing, promotions and so on.

What I hadn’t expected was how much momentum I’d actually lose. Although I was able to get all reviews transferred, it was like completely starting from scratch and I had several months where I sold no copies at all which was pretty heart-breaking. It took a free promotion on Steven over May Bank Holiday weekend in celebration of the launch of my fourth novel to finally get sales moving again.

The ideas just kept coming and you’ve written four more since Steven. Are they all taken from things that have happened to you? How much of you is in the books?

 

When I started writing Steven, I quickly realised I had a trilogy on my hands because, as I developed the characters of her two best friends, Elise (the focus of Getting Over Gary) and Clare (the focus of Dreaming About Daran), I knew they both had stories to tell that were way bigger than a sub-plot in Steven would allow. Their stories are 100% fictional, as are they as characters. Raving About Rhys is a novella set before Steven and, again, it’s purely from the depths of my imagination.

Steven, however, has a lot of me in it and the protagonist, Sarah, is predominantly modeled on me. When I set up my teddy bear shop, I arrived at work one day to find a business card through the door for a sign-maker … called Steve. I got a call from a company to say a rep was in the area … called Stephen. Eek! Stevens/Steves/Stephens seemed to be everywhere so I used these types of scenarios in the story, although how they played out is very different. I certainly didn’t humiliate myself like Sarah did when Stephen the plasterer arrived. Sarah’s personality and her phrases are very me too. Friends and family members who’ve read the book tell me how much of me they can spot.

As for Bear With Me, I am indeed an arctophile (collector of teddy bears). I ran my teddy bear shop and I can also make jointed bears so I drew on that experience and passion. My shop was called Bear’s Pad and I’ve given that name to my protagonist’s mum’s cottage. The bears I make are called Ju-Sea Bears so I used that brand in the book too. Other than those nods to my past, the knowledge about bears and the experience of having a bear shop and being a bear-maker, everything in Bear With Me is absolute fiction.

How do you deal with it if the odd person doesn’t who like your books as much as you’d like? Do you take it personally?

I’ve mainly had amazing reviews for Steven but there have been a couple of reviews where the readers haven’t loved Sarah quite so much, saying she’s naïve or silly and wouldn’t do those things. I don’t take this personally and, because I know that I’ve been in some of those situations myself, I know how I reacted and if that was naïve or silly, so be it.

How soon into book one did you have the idea for book two? And how do you develop it, are you a planner or do you write and see where the words take you?

Although I set out to write a standalone novel, I discovered I had a trilogy on my hands pretty quickly. I needed Sarah to have two best friends so that one would believe the clairvoyant reading (Elise) and one would be completely dismissive of it (Clare) and their perspectives would pull Sarah in two different directions. As the two characters developed, Clare in particular held my interest. Elise is a very placid individual and Clare’s quite spiky and I felt that there had to be something in her past which had made her that way. Her story is the final one in the trilogy but it’s my favourite as it’s full of twists and turns.

When it comes to my writing approach, I’m part-plotter and part-pantser. With Steven, I knew what the ending would be and kept writing and experimenting until I got there. With so many re-writes, I decided that I would plan Gary to avoid being in that situation again. But I didn’t end up sticking to the plan because my characters kept pulling me in different directions so I decided there was something in the “just go with it” approach. With Daran, I had a loose plan but massively developed him as I wrote, then tweaked a few plot holes in the editing process. Bear was the same; a rough idea and he pretty much wrote himself.

Can you talk a little about the technical side of self-publishing. How difficult is it?

I’m lucky because my husband’s day job is as a typesetter so he lays out the pages for me and converts them into the file that’s needed for KDP (Kindle Direct Publishing). He has also designed all of my covers so I leave the technical bits to him. It’s pretty straightforward, though.

After release, there’s a KDP dashboard on which all your books sit. You can make changes through that e.g. to categories and pricing. You can also keep track of sales by the hour which is helpful.

Is writing your full-time job? If not when do you find the time to write. How soon after one book is finished to you start another?

I wish! It would be amazing to write every day and earn enough from that to pay the mortgage but that is a distant dream. Other than my career break with Bear’s Pad, I’ve always worked in Human Resources. Now I’m an HR Tutor. I work from home, marking assignments for students studying their CIPD (the HR professional qualification). I also tutor on weekend workshops and I’m a Brown Owl, running a Brownie Pack for 24 seven to 10 year olds.

Time to write is therefore rare and precious. I don’t watch much TV which helps, I’m used to working very long days (often still working until 10 or 11pm), and I grab my moments were I can although I wish I had a lot more time.

When I worked on the trilogy, I had a stage where all three of them were a work in progress in that I was still editing Steven for publication, still editing Gary ready for submitting to my publisher, and still writing Daran. I would have moved onto Bear straight after Daran but my day job was so demanding that I had to take a few months off before I could work on that. As soon as I’d published Bear, I started on my Christmas novella and I’m hoping to have that finished in a couple of months so I can start working on another full-length novel.

Any words of encouragement for those who are perhaps struggling with either writing their stories or getting them published?

Think about why you write. I’d imagine that, for most pre-published writers, it’s because they couldn’t imagine not writing. Creating characters and worlds gives them joy. Hang onto that joy. It can be really easy to lose this when you’re getting rejections, or when you get your work out there but it doesn’t sell loads, or when you get your first low-star review.

jessicaquote

Don’t give up when you get rejections because it doesn’t mean your writing is poor; it just means it’s not right for that publisher or agent at that particular time. But it may be for someone. Or it may be that you were meant to go indie instead.

And, it’s got to be asked, did you find your Steven?

Ha ha ha. No! I came across several Stevens in my search but the closest I came to romance was a few dates with a Simon who then dumped me by text, confessing that he’d only started seeing me to make his ex jealous and it had worked. Nice! A couple of months after opening Bear’s Pad, I met Mark and we’ll have been married for 13 years this September. His middle name and his surname have no connection to the name Steven.

Thank you so much to Jessica for taking the time to answer my questions in such detail. I found them really entertaining but also inspiring; I was buzzing with enthusiasm for my own story after I read them. I hope, if you are in need of a little encouragement, they do the same for you. Thanks also to Susanna Bavin (her debut, The Deserter’s Daughter, is out now) for introducing us.

If you enjoy contemporary romance I can highly recommend Jessica’s books (I’m a HUGE fan, can you tell?). You can also find out more about her work via her website , you can buy her books via Amazon and also follow her on Twitter.

I’ll have another Behind The Book post for you later in the month but for now you can catch up if you’ve missed any here.