A Look Behind The Book With Aby Moore.

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An undisputed star of the blogging world, Aby Moore could quite easily sit back and revel in the success her hard work has brought her. Instead, this Mamapreneur wants to inspire others to turn their hobby into a thriving business  – and she’s happy to show them how.

Among many other things, she writes articles offering tips on ways to make money from blogging on her own popular site, You Baby, Me Mummy, runs mentoring courses, workshops and has a busy Facebook community.  As if that wasn’t enough, Aby has just released her first book, Blogs Change Lives, to make it even easier for those wanting to take things to the next level.

Her daughter, Ava, is the same age as Freya and I first started reading Aby’s blog when she was focussed on parenting but, even at the start, she was always willing to offer help and encouragement. To see the way her blogging empire has grown and evolved over the years has been amazing but the best thing is, Aby has remained the same friendly, helpful person she always was.

I was thrilled when she agreed to be my latest Behind The Book interviewee.

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I can’t think of anyone better to write a book about blogging but what made you want to do it? What are you hoping people get from it?

Thanks so much, that’s very kind of you to say that. Growing up I longed to write a book. As a lover of a good project, the idea appealed to me, but I could never think of a suitable topic. I wanted it to be something I felt passionately about. Something that I could pour my heart into.

Years (and years!) passed and still no book. Then in 2013 I had my daughter and later that year was diagnosed with Post Natal Depression. My life totally and utterly changed, as it turned out eventually for the better! I wanted to capture the magic which had led to so many wonderful things happening in my life and so I wrote this book.

My blog fixed me and continues to do so every day. I’ve worked with international brands, had amazing opportunities and have also been able to support my family. Then it struck me! My story could help others. My story could show people who have never considered blogging just how powerful it is. While providing people who already have blogs with a clear roadmap for them to follow and succeed. I started writing mid way through November and just three months later the book was finished!

I’m so incredibly proud of Blogs Change Lives. I wrote it to show all the mamas out there that they do not have to put their dreams on hold. Nor do they have to leave their children to go out to work for someone else (if this is not what they want). They can create their own empires.

BlogschangelivesHow exactly has your blog changed your life?

My blog has always given me somewhere to escape to when I’ve needed it. Which over the years has proved invaluable.

However, the best thing that blogging has given me are some amazing friendships with beautiful, courageous and driven women that I have the pleasure of calling my friends.

My blog turned into a business which has supported my family, but also been a springboard to other things, such as starting a podcast, running an online summit, oh and writing a book!

You’ve carried your chatty and friendly but confident blog style through to your book. It’s almost like you’re our best friend and we’ve asked you for help. Did it just naturally happen that way? 

That’s so lovely to hear. I think it’s so important to show up with authenticity and so I had to write this book as me. It’s my story and I wanted to tell it in my own voice and make a connection with my readers that was genuine and would be cohesive with my voice across my other platforms.

Blogging has changed so much over the years. What’s one good thing and one bad thing you think has happened

I’m seeing more and more bloggers go on to achieve awesome things outside the blogging niche. This is so wonderful and is a testament to their creativity and hard work. More and more people are expanding and diversifying their work and subsequently their income streams. This is all so positive for bloggers.

However, I think there has been an influx of newer bloggers who think monetising a blog is easy (which we all know it isn’t!). They are expecting to work for a couple of hours a week and earn decent money in return.

Your own blog has also evolved. Did you make a conscious decision to write less about parenting Ava? Do you miss a more therapeutic style of blogging?

It definitely wasn’t a conscious decision. I absolutely love helping people with their blogs and so as my experience grew my niche changed. I would much rather talk about blogging and business, than potty training and weaning, so it’s a better fit for me. I still write about my family when it’s relevant and I really want to show people that I still walk the walk. I’m a working mum, who has to juggle her child with the demands of a business. I still work with brands and do all the things I’m training them to do, which I feel makes me authentic.

What’s your favourite part of your blogging life now (including things such as giving inspirational talks at blog meet ups etc)?

I love doing Facebook lives and helping my community. I also really enjoy creating videos for YouTube.

What about the actual task of writing the book. How did you fit that it around work and parenting?

I’m quite driven, so when I decided I wanted to start writing it I did. I’d just got on the Eurostar in London andy the time I reached Paris I had 3,000 words written. I repurposed some content too. Writing my book just became a daily priority. Even if you write 2,000 words a day you can create a decent room in around 3 months.

Can we talk self-publishing? Was it natural, as a blogger who has been self- publishing for years, to go down that route?

It is difficult, as I think there tends to be a certain degree of ‘extra’ status. However, I was seeing more and more entrepreneurs who I look up to self-publishing their own books successful. I also create my business so I’m not reliant on other people. I’m not tied to brand work. If that goes quiet, I have other products.

Aby Moore Quote

This is your first book, have you thought about writing any more? Maybe fiction?

I think it was a one time thing! To be honest I’m not the world’s most creative person. If you gave me a topic, I could write a book!

What is your top writing tip?

Break it down into a daily writing word count. My book is 75k words, so if you have a rough word count in mind and then always write your daily allocation your book will be finished before you know it.

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I love Aby’s attitude to self-publishing, it makes complete sense when she says it like that.

I can’t thank her enough for answering my questions and wish her every success with her book, which, at the time of writing, has ALL five star reviews on Amazon.

Want to find out more? You can visit Aby’s site here, follow her on TwitterInstragram and Facebook, watch her YouTube videos and, of couse, you can buy Blogs Change Lives via Amazon here.

Are you a blogger? Have you thought about trying to take your blog to the next level?

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Book Review (And Excerpt): The Beta Mum – Adventures In Alpha Land.

image1Navigating playground politics was one of the many things I was worried about when Freya started nursery last September.

Thankfully, there haven’t been any issues (so far). In fact, the other mums have been really lovely and nothing like what poor Sophie, the highly relatable heroine in Isabella Davidson’s debut novel, encounters.

She has been transported to the bright lights of London – something Isabella, who writes the popular blog, Notting Hill Yummy Mummy, knows a thing or two about.

After her young daughter starts at an exclusive nursery, Sophie encounters the Alpha Mums for the first time. Not sure who they are? Have a read of the blurb and you’ll see:

When Sophie Bennett moves from a quiet sleepy suburb of Toronto to glitzy west London, she doesn’t know where she has landed: Venus or Mars. Her three-year-old daughter Kaya attends Cherry Blossoms, the most exclusive nursery in London, where Sophie finds herself adrift in a sea of Alpha Mums. These mothers are glamorous, gorgeous, competitive and super rich, especially Kelly, the blonde, beautiful and bitchy class rep.

Struggling to fit in and feeling increasingly isolated, Sophie starts ‘The Beta Mum’, an anonymous blog describing her struggles with the Alpha Mums. But when her blog goes viral, she risks ruining everything for herself and her daughter. How long will it be until they discover her true identity? Is her marriage strong enough to survive one of her follower’s advances? And will she ever fit in with the Alpha Mums?

As a blogger, who occasionally writes about nursery life, the premise of Beta Mum immediately appealed to me – especially when it was clear that her posts were going to get her into trouble. I can totally see why Sophie starts her blog; it’s like a much-needed friend to talk to (especially when people start commenting).

I felt genuinely upset for her. The behaviour she initially has to contend with at the nursery gates is dreadful – it’s like being back at (a really terrible) school herself. Some of the things that happen to her actually made me cringe – and the worst part is, while it is a work of fiction, much of it is based on fact.

I think that’s part of the reason why it’s hard to put the book down. Isabella writes an eye-opening account of the (quite often over the top) lives of the super rich and their children, which also makes for entertaining reading. However, behind the glitz and glamour, the cutting barbs and backstabbing are real people with real problems and in the end I almost felt sorry for some of the Alpha Mums.

With plenty of drama and also a few laughs along the way, this book is an engaging read right from the start. But, don’t just take my word for it, scroll down for an excerpt.

Format: Kindle.

Price: £3.99.

My rating: Four stars.

The Beta Mum – Chapter Eleven Excerpt – by Isabella Davidson.

A huge life-sized, plush, golden giraffe with scattered spots stared at me giving me the eye, as if to say ‘I know who you are, Sophie Bennett, you’re not one of them. You’re one of us. You’re an onlooker.’ The winding staircase of Serafina’s member’s club had led me down into Serafina’s nightclub where I had found myself face to face with the giant giraffe.

I had read up on (googled) Serafina’s before coming; it was an exclusive member’s club costing £3,000 a year for a membership and had welcomed everyone from Tom Cruise to Prince William through its doors with three bar areas, two restaurants, one nightclub and 16 hotel rooms. The restaurant had poached a chef from Nobu and served fusion-food classics including tuna tartare, lobster tempura and black miso cod. The bar areas channelled the Dolce Vita vibe, with white-uniformed barmen, serving Martinis to show off their mixology skills and drinks made with absinthe.

The nightclub had an upscale, louche, bordello-like feel to it, in keeping with its location, the old respectable (or rather unrespectable) red light district in Mayfair. It was dark and windowless, with its burgundy walls draped with red velvet curtains. On my left stood a glittering bar where late twenty-somethings with youthful aspirations were dressed to impress and stood drinking champagne and colourful cocktails adorned with edible flowers. On my right, I saw some familiar faces from the nursery pick-ups and drop-offs heading towards the direction of a private room.

I squeezed Michael’s hand as we walked in their direction. My heart pounded just a bit faster than I wanted it to and my social anxiety increased with every step I made towards the private room. I wanted to be anywhere but here, ideally sitting in front of our TV with my Roots sweatshirt/sweatpants combo or in front of my laptop, hiding behind a screen rather than exposing my vulnerabilities to the Alphas. This was not the usual parents’ evening in the school gym with soft-drinks-and-pizza-slices.

That night, Kelly wore a tight, cerulean, asymmetrical, skin-tight dress, and Becky wore a wrap dress with what looked like a flowery red, pink and purple print. I sidled up to them, seeing no other familiar faces and since they were standing next to Michael.

‘Hi, it’s nice to see both of you again. I wanted to ask you about the winter fair and how I could volunteer,’ I said to both of them.

Kelly’s face looked blank, not registering who I was, despite having met numerous times.

‘Hi Sophie,’ Becky said. ‘We are planning on sending out an email about the winter fair in the next few days,’

‘Oh, I didn’t recognise you at all, Sophie darling.’ Kelly’s face now showed some recognition. ‘You look completely different in a dress and heels. You look … taller … and prettier. Don’t you usually always wear jeans and converse?’

‘Yes … but I thought I should try to “Keep up with the Cherry Blossoms Mums” tonight.’ I tried to crack a joke, which clearly went over their heads, as they continued to look at me as if I were commenting on the weather.

‘You should dress up more often, Sophie, you look so much better in a dress. And you should wear make-up. It really brings out your eyes,’ Kelly went on. ‘And it’s nice to see you wearing proper shoes. We’re a bit too old to be wearing Converse, don’t you think?’ She gave me her pursed, condescending smile.

What I really wanted to do was roll my eyes at her, but I decided that it was too early in the night to start making enemies. Instead, I gulped down my champagne and took another one from a passing waitress.

‘Kelly, I love your shoes!’ Becky exclaimed, looking down at Kelly’s shoes as if they were made of gold, diverting the conversation away from my apparently underachieving daily dress sense.

‘Oh, thanks, Becky,’ Kelly contently smiled. ‘They’re Zoe Phillips.

‘Who’s Zoe Phillips?’ I shyly asked, feeling ignorant.

‘You don’t know Zoe Phillips?’ Kelly looked at me incredulously and patronisingly, wide-eyed, with faint disdain as if I had admitted to never having heard of Nelson Mandela or Martin Luther King. ‘They’re Jimmy Choos but better. And much more exclusive. She’s the hottest shoe designer right now. I had to wait four weeks for them to be made – bespoke – and to have my initials inscribed in the sole. Just in case I lose them.’ She laughed. ‘Do you know she’s going to be a Cherry Blossoms mum soon? She has a 1-year-old and lives in Notting Hill, so it’s really close to her.’

‘I live in Notting Hill.’ I said, trying to make up for my embarrassment.

‘Oh, I lived in Notting Hill once, but it was too dodgy. I realised that I am an Upper East Side girl at heart,’ Kelly said. ‘So now I live in Kensington and I feel much safer.’

Kelly couldn’t help herself but to criticise every word I uttered. I took another sip of my champagne and then moved on to a Martini to assuage Kelly’s criticisms.

Thank you to Isabella for letting me read her book and include an excerpt here and also to the lovely Clare from Mud and Nettles for putting us in touch.

 

New Series Alert: Behind The Book – Meet The Author.


I love to read (as you can probably tell by the number of reviews I post) but quite often when a book is finished I am left with questions – not about plot or character development, necessarily, more about the author and their path to print.

Sometimes I itch to send them a tweet or an email but, for some reason, they feel a bit unreachable – probably because they have done the thing I aspire to and not only written but published a book. It’s like on publication day they are transported to a hall of fame where they stand on a pedestal with a plaque stating “author” underneath. While you are invited to admire them from a distance, a strict no touching rule is in force. Not that I want to touch the authors, just to be clear, but I would really like to talk to them.

After I started posting reviews at the beginning of last year I found myself chatting with some of the writers and I discovered they are actually quite open to communicating with readers, maybe even enjoy it, in some cases. I tentatively asked a couple whether they would be willing to let me pick their brains about the writing process and post about it here. I’m delighted to say the responses have been positive. See, they are just like us, after all.

So amid posts about my parenting fails, photography, my rubbish attempts at crafting (and cooking, for that matter), book reviews and general nonsense, I’m going to occasionally feature Behind The Book interviews.

I already have a couple of lovely people lined up but I thought I’d throw open the floor and see if anyone else is willing to share their story.

If you are a published author (any genre and self-published more than welcome) I’d love to interview you about your journey into print (or ebook). I will email you 10 tailored questions and will require the answers along with a photo of you and an image of your book cover. In return you will have my heartfelt thanks and I will, of course, provide a link to your work and your social media details (I promise there is no touching involved).

If you’re a reader/writer with a burning question about publishing a book please let me know and I’ll add it in when the time is right. When I use your question I’ll link to your blog or Twitter etc.

Fancy joining in? Please drop me an email at tara@taragreaves.com.